• 1. NOITA NEILA (04:30)
  • 2. ELAQUEST (11:30)
  • 3. LONESCARISO (05:31)
  • 4. ESUNI SETAG (09:05)
  • 5. THE FUNNY SIDE OF DISCREET (06:30)
  • 6. OSIRAC SENOL (14:57)
  • 7. ER PLAYER BLUES NOW (03:23)

The Gentle Harm of the Bourgeoisie

Performers:

Trombone – Paul Rutherford

The definitive solo trombone album. "This is certainly one of the best LPs of the year." (John Litweiler, 1977) "A tour de force which must be heard to be believed." (Victor Schonfield, 1987) "The best record of solo free improvising you are likely to find." (Derek Bailey, 1987) 55 minutes.

Excerpts from sleeve notes:
In the early 1970s, Paul Rutherford (1940 - 2007) started to perform in public as a solo improviser. It is in this format that one can, perhaps, best appreciate his inventiveness and originality. The most obvious aspect is his use of additional techniques to those taught in the conservatory, notably his remarkable use of mutes and his voice, both enhanced by his sense of humour. (He was probably the first trombonist in this area of music to use his voice to create multi-phonics.) However, attention should also be paid to the shapes and directions of his improvisations.

All of the improvised trombone solos on this CD were recorded at three of the then weekly Musicians' Co-operative concerts that were held at the late Unity Theatre in 1974. All seven extracts originally chosen by Rutherford are included and presented in the orderof performance.

It should be noted that there was absolutely no electronic trickery involved in the production of this music - what you hear is just (!) one man, a trombone and some mutes. The percussive sounds were generally caused by a mute interacting with the bell of the trombone, or with the table on which they were kept during the performances. Other such sounds were caused by the interaction of feet and floor, and (unintentionally, I hope) the trombone slide hitting a microphone stand - a hazard of recording trombonists! The bubbling sounds at the end of ELAQUEST are the result of not having emptied any fluid from the instrument since the beginning of the performance.

This album was the first of Rutherford's solo work to be recorded, and is an excellent representation of his music in 1974. When it was first issued a couple of years later, it caused quite a stir amongst those improvisers and laymen who had previously not heard his work. Several improvisers, not only trombonists, were profoundly influenced by it. Today, it should also cause quite a stir amongst those who are not familiar with his music, since it is probably the finest solo trombone album ever made.
MARTIN DAVIDSON (1986 & 1997)

Album label: 
Release date: 
01.01 / 1976
Recording date: 
02.07 / 1974
Recording location: 
London (Unity Theatre) 1974 Jul 2, Aug 20, Dec 17
Credits:
Artwork design : Paul Rutherford
Producer : Martin Davidson
Recording engineer : Martin Davidson

You might also like

Paul Rutherford
Peter Brötzmann
Steve Lacy